A Resource to Celebrate Saint Nicholas

A Resource to Celebrate Saint Nicholas

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It’s always surprised me how adults burden themselves during the Christmas Holiday Season by playing Santa, and they neglect to honor his prototype St. Nicholas.

Do you know who St. Nicholas was and is? The Greek Archdiocese of America has an Advent page that features information concerning the feasts and traditions the surround Christmas. This includes an extensive bio on St. Nicholas.

A few points of interest

He has proven himself to be a defender of the faith during the first Ecumenical Council and an example of the virtues of prayer and fasting.

He often secretly gave his wealth to the poor. There is one example where he covertly gave a father money for his daughter’s dowry so they could avoid a life of prostitution. Today, St. Nicolas is a patron saint for those in search of a spouse.

His name day is remembered on December 6 with simple traditions and carols. In Europe, children leave shoes on their doorsteps to be filled with oranges and candies. In America, many pick this date to decorate their Christmas tree.

St. Nicholas is one of the most beloved saints across all cultures of Orthodoxy.

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About author
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Presvytera Vassi Haros

Presvytera Vassi Makris Haros is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati's College of Design, Art, Architecture & Planning and Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology. She is the owner, designer and photographer of V’s Cardbox, In Service and Love. a greeting card company featuring cards with an Orthodox voice. She strongly feels that experiencing the Orthodox Faith through the church’s cyclical calendar of feasts and fasts is a gift that is too often overlooked.